December 2004 | Vol. 73, No. 3
Articles

Default Rules in Inheritance Law: A Problem in Search of Its Context

by Adam J. Hirsch

Bursting the Chevron Bubble: Clarifying the Scope of Judicial Review in Troubled Times

by John H. Reese
Notes
Colloquium

Foreword

by Bruce A. Green

Teaching Ethics/Doing Justice

by Anthony V. Alfieri

Access to Justice: Some Comments

by Lawrence M. Friedman

Gideon's Paradox

by Lawrence C. Marshall

Actual Innocence in New York: The Curious Case of People v. Hamilton

by Benjamin E. Rosenberg

This piece takes an in-depth look at the recent New York Appellate Division decision People v. Hamilton.   In Hamilton, the Second Department allowed a freestanding actual innocence claim under New York law.   While courts in some other states, including state appellate courts, have recognized such actual innocence claims, whether such claims should be recognized, and if so under what circumstances, is a very live issue in the federal courts and numerous state courts throughout the country.   

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FISA Surveillance and Aliens

by Amit K. Chhabra
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